ilovefoodandkorra

ilovefoodandkorra:

dream-piper:

coolman229:

machuran replied to your post:Hey, have you seen Korra’s new design for Book 4? I believe that it look nice. From viewing the facial expressions and aesthetics from the designs that Bryke provided, it seems that in Book 4, Korra will finally experience…

 OK discussion time. This is from a lovely follower of mine.

Firstly Korra being poisoned and almost dying is not something she deserved because she wasn’t nice nor was it a chance for character development. Wishing that a woman who is strong willed be knocked down a peg in order for her to learn a lesson is disgusting and misogynistic. And what exactly was the lesson she needed to learn in Book 3? That sacrificing yourself to save the lives of several people is wrong? That trying to stop people who are on a mission to murder people in cold blood is wrong? She didn’t make a single bad the decision the entirety of Book 3 so I’m honestly curious what she deserved to be punished for other than still being herself. Character development doesn’t mean a character gets a personality transplant. You are looking for Korra to be like Aang which will never happen because they are not the same person and did not have the same upbringing. 

Secondly if you prefer a protagonist that is optimistic 24/7 rather than one who is rash and passionate that’s fine. But Aang lost his cool several times. He was still running away from his problems right up until the last four episodes. He is not nor has he ever been a flawless character. It’s telling that Aang not losing his true self is a reason to praise him yet Korra growing but still being Korra at her foundation is a reason to condemn her. More wish to be crippled and in pain for several episodes so that she’ll emerge a carbon copy of Aang.

Thirdly you are surely watching a different show if you’re saying the triangle has been detrimental to Korra as a character. In Book 1 she went after Mako once and then dropped it. Her concern from then on was Amon. In Book 2 had she been the love sick idiot you claim she wouldn’t have confronted Mako for ruining her chances of getting help for her family. she would have agreed with him and sat on her hands as they were wiped out by Unalaq. But she didn’t. She did everything in her power to try and prevent the war even though it was destroying her relationship. She wasn’t focused on romance at all. Book 3 she didn’t even have a romantic interest her focus was entirely on the new air nation and stopping the Red Lotus. So again your claims aren’t supported by canon. Comparing Korra to Bella of all people has to be the biggest most inaccurate reach I’ve ever seen in my life.

Korra being a teenage girl that wants is confident but secretly feels she’ll never live up to “better people” is realistic. Her being a teenager who wants romance is realistic. Her making mistakes and then bouncing back is realistic. 

A character doesn’t have to be likable to be well written. That isn;t how writing works. And a character that has no flaws is at the end of the their journey and therefore has no room to grow. 

Every single male character you listed screwed up several times and made ridiculous mistakes the difference is that they weren’t written off as bad characters. Their flaws weren’t tattooed on their foreheads like people do with female characters. What about Wan who opened pandora’s box but was instantly forgiven? What about Tony Stark who was an asshole until the crap he was doing started to affect him personally? They get to be called heroes but Korra is the one who deserves to be knocked to the ground until she’s nice? Tony Stark never even stopped being a asshole come to think of it but that’s perfectly okay. 

The triangle mostly involved Mako and Asami arguing while Korra was somewhere else dealing with A plot. It never scratched her or stopped her from getting things done.

Korra is allowed to cry when she’s felt that she’s lost her entire identity that isn’t a problem. Aang was allowed to cry and throw a fit over Appa correct? What did he get out of that? How did he supposedly grow after acting like such a brat? He didn’t. He carried on being Aang and then eventually found Appa. Zuko fell to a fever because he was conflicted but when he woke up he was right back to making bad decisions. Expecting Korra to come out of a funk and suddenly have all the wisdom of the world is ridiculous. Her losing her bending trying to stop a terrorist wasn’t opportunity for her to learn a lesson (read become a likable proper lady) it was something that was done to her. 

Korra from Book 3 is not the same Korra from the beginning of Book 2. To say the Korra from B2  who was angry with the controlling men (who by the way had imprisoned and lied to her for over a decade and were deliberately keeping her from doing her job even as dark spirits were attacking and killing people) is the same Korra who was willing to forgive and forget by the B2 8th episode is wrong. She has changed and she has grown. There isn’t a counter argument for this because your opinion that Korra had no growth whatsoever is not supported by canon. You clearly have not been watching The Legend of Korra I’m not sure what show you’ve been watching actually. 

~Ambelle

Dear Ambelle,

Well I wanted this to be a proactive argument instead of one where you accuse a person for being a certain way, but I guess it wasn’t going to go that way with you. Normally in debates you say your side and defend with reasons, without subjectively attacking the person you are debating with.

Second, I asked why you like Korra, not to take what I said and disregard it. You gave no examples of why she is a great character (or at least listed it) you for the most part, just said I was watching a different show/that she didn’t do this or that/this isn’t atla/etc.

Regardless of this though, let’s get back to the debate.

FIrst of all, let me remind you that this is fiction and that wishing harm on Korra is the same as wishing harm on a Barney the Dinosaur (not the person in the suit, but the character himself). 

I would never wish harm on a person, or wish harm on any living thing because that teaches you nothing but violence.

Also, I never wished something bad to happen to her this is what I said, and I quote:

Despite all the disappointment and disinterest that came from Book 3, I was glad that they finally kicked down Korra a peg, especially since she’s been going around like a mad dog for the last three seasons. “

For Korra to be in such a detrimental state will finally give her something to work from, especially since she doesn’t have the sort of backstory/history as other characters like Mako, Bolin and Asami (Lost a parent, was raised poor, was raised a pacifist, etc.) In fact, Korra never really starts out with many problems and is shown to have lived a full, happy life up until the events of Book One. Usually in creative writing, you strive to either have your story have some sort of story to work from (Asami’s backround story for example) or the story sets into motion something for them (like how Simba loses his father to his uncle). But up until now, there hasn’t been anything of to affect her that has been of great importance. Sure you could argue that all the finales have done something to change her, but these were all mostly for the plot rather than for Korra’s backstory EXCEPT for the wheelchair incident.

Seeing that part was like seeing Hiccup from HTTYD come out with his leg gone. I was stunned and wondered how they show would go with her in this current state, much like I wondered at Hiccup. But while HTTYD actually showed Hiccup use his disability to his advantage, I doubt they will keep her chair-bound for long.

Anyways on to the next part!

——————
No of course it’s never wrong for self-sacrifice. For me, her sacrificing herself was unnecessary though. If four kids could take down an army in ATLA, or three kids and two adults could put in a covert operation to escape an escapable prison, I don’t see why four to five adults (this includes strategist Zuko) and five teenagers couldn’t come up with a plan to save a super small group of airbenders from four people who could BARELY capture Korra with only fighting about the same number of people. Had their been something big in their way, like they had their souls stuck in the Spirit World and only Zaheer could get them out, or the entire place was being protected by thousands upon thousands of men, I would have passed. But it didn’t look that way. 

Everything just seems very coincidental in terms of the capture of the air nation (much like the capture of the air kids by Amon in Book 1)

—————————————-

As for Korra to have a character transplant. No, she just needs to have a personality and stick with it. If she is hot-headed, stick with it. If she is curious stick with it. If she is just, stick with it. If she is stubborn and independent, stick with it. But a character doesn’t flip flop. She doesn’t act like one way and then change for another.

At the start of Book 3 I was happy with Korra. She listened, she was passionate about helping people, and seemed like she wanted to help the world over herself. She was selfless and calm. But as soon as she started acting all smug with the President, as soon as she decided to leave Republic City to it’s spiritual fate (plot device that the president would ban her, even though I would to if I was the president and someone berated me in front of everyone), and as soon as she starts airbender hunting she goes back to her forceful, quick to act self.

Also, bad decisions list:
Bragging and berating the President so that she gets kicked out of Republic City- Bad?

Deciding to sit down for tea when a potential suspect for attempted kidnapping is in front of you and could easily poison you/capture you/ or escape-Bad?

Leaving by herself, despite being advised by an adult with more experience, with a bunch of teens to chase those who attempted to kidnap you, who eventually rekidnap you because of your decision- Bad?

Deciding to forcefully enter an airship room and fight while it’s being flown without thinking that they might control the entire ship and that you might damage something or someone- Bad?

Deciding to give up self without thinking of a contingency plan should the enemy decide they want to be psychopaths and kill everyone- Bad?

^^^^ I’ll admit that bad, in these terms, is more defined as “not smart”

———————

Also, I never, ever, EVER, said that I wanted Korra to be Aang. I would much like the opposite thank you. I wonder why people always assume people want Korra to be Aang 2.0? 

What I want however, is for Korra to be a likable character like at least one of the Gaang. But that can’t be done because Korra doesn’t have a motivation like they did, however I already talked about this in my other post which can be found and commented on HERE——> Korra (http://dream-piper.tumblr.com/post/78966436495/motivations-for-characters-korra-vs-aang-in-response)

In fact, that link contains most of the reason why I don’t care for Korra, while most of it is Book 2, it still applies because Korra still doesn’t have a clear motivation outside wanting to bring “Balance” to the world, which is extremely vague and the job of the Avatar( talking about personal motivation and conviction)

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Secondly, again I didn’t say anything at all about wanting someone who is positive 24/7? Which post are you reading? I am confused where you got that. Yes, I loved that Aang lost his cool because of the many times something got on his nerves. Why did those things get on his nerves? Because they conflicted with his personality or backstory!

Got mad that he lost his people? BELIEVABLE
Got angry that people are accusing his only friend from the past of bringing the team down? BELIEVABLE.
Got ticked that everyone wants you to abandon your life’s teaching of pacifism to kill a dictator? TOTALLY BELIEVABLE!

Aang reacted that way because, as a character, IT MADE SENSE for him to react that way. That’s what a well written character is supposed to do!

But let’s look at Korra.

Let’s say that the closest character in the ATLA universe to Korra is Toph.

Toph was imprisoned at an early age. Much like Korra (although she wasn’t surpressed because of her blindness and wasn’t kept from other people)

Toph has a short temper and a big dog attitude. Again like Korra.

Both are prodigies for their age and are rebellious as well.

However, the only difference is their motivation.
Toph was raised as a secluded princess, told what to do, thought as weak and feeble and hidden almost like her parents were ashamed of her. She wanted to get away from that.

Her motivation was freedom, to explore the world, and to help the Avatar because he helped her. Later on it would be to explore metalbending. Toph’s motivation fit her in all the right places.

But what about Korra? If you think about it, she doesn’t really have any personal motivations because she never see her have any inner turmoil outside of “being a good Avatar.” But why is that? Why is she ABSOLUTELY obsessed with being the best Avatar ever?

We don’t know. They never explore that. But now they have the opportunity too. 

Had Bryke taken out some of the unnecessary plot points within all of the Books (probending, the whole war thing in Book 2, or the Earth Queen) we could have focused on more scenes with Korra showing or talking about how she was raised to do nothing but be the Avatar, how her parents could only talk about her being the Avatar, and how she couldn’t play with other children, or do normal things kids do. 

They could have focused on how naive, or curious of the outside world she is, make her have an adventurous spirit to go with her rebellious self. And for the first Book, that was they were trying to aim for (until the romance came in and ruined any opportunities for her to be an independent character by the finale)

But Book 2 largely took Korra’s traits and confused them. Instead of being rebellious, adventurous, curious, and just, she was dependent and downright bipolar. Until…..the mindsweep. After that, I’m not sure where Korra’s character was going. I gave up at that point.

But no. I don’t want Aang and Korra to be the same. I just want Korra to be as developed as him. Whether she’s learning a lesson that stays learned, or being punished for doing something that obviously was wrong, a character should have to experience growth by encountering an obstacle in their path, gaining experience from them, and applying what they’ve learned in their next run in.

———————————-

*facepalms* Let’s not get into the love triangle if you don’t think there is a problem with it. I have written far too many critiques on it and by now I am tired of saying the same thing over and over again.

In summary, chasing down a boy that has already been taken is bad. Ignoring the fact that said boy is in a relationship as he tries to push himself onto her is bad.
Kissing a boy, whom she doesn’t know if he is broken up with (cause we NEVER got to see Asami scream, “I’m officially broken up) is bad for reasons.
Getting mad at your bf for trying to do his job, prevent a war that will endanger the lives of many/stop all the peace that Aang has tried to establish/ and is because of YOUR fault in the first place is not smart
Going at him, and wrecking his stuff is bad

After that, it’s all on Mako (though most EVERYTHING done has been Mako’s fault) but those tidbits were Korra’s. So mostly it hurt her character in Book One, which, if you read my rant correctly, you will see I said that she BARELY made it out of romance.

Also, when referring to Romance, I was literally attributing my rant to any strong female MC that has fallen, not just Korra. Same with Tragedy and Leadership. When I mean that Romance destroys female MCs, I mean that they destroy the potential of the main character because they focus on other characters involved in their triangle (in this case, Mako, Asami, and formerly, Bolin). I wasn’t blaming it all on Korra. They just spent too many scenes of their precious time of 13 episodes on love stuff that didn’t matter to the plot or character development.

———————————-

Korra being a teenage girl that wants is confident but secretly feels she’ll never live up to “better people” is realistic. Her being a teenager who wants romance is realistic. Her making mistakes and then bouncing back is realistic. 

Agree with you a hundred percent. Didn’t say anything against this.
I am wondering if you truly read my post, because I actually agree with some of what you said.

Except for the bouncing back part. It depends on HOW she bounces back. Book One bouncing back is unrealistic. Hiccup isn’t going to magically get his leg back. Simba’s dad isn’t going to suddenly come alive. Bending powers shouldn’t automatically come back because you were crying on the side of a hill. When they said that was Korra’s lowest point, I immediately thought that the creators, Bryke, were saying,

"Yeah Aang could take his people getting slaughtered, his bison getting taken, his Avatar state being locked up, and failing as the avatar because he was a boy. His lowest point was almost dying by fiery firelord death and so he is super strong. But because Korra’s a girl, her lowest point is not having three elements. Since girls are emotional, it makes sense, right?"

I was super ticked when I saw Aang stand over her and just say, “here” something that was super hard for me to obtain is now free for you to use. Where was this plot device when Ba Sing Se was being attacked? Or when Aang was going to die all those times under extreme stress? 

That is not bouncing back. That is being rewarded for your mistakes (her mistake was to try and face Amon alone… AFTER NOT LEARNING THE FIRST TIME). Because of this, they could’ve had Korra learn her lesson here, but because they didn’t think through another season it lead to the weird, rushed mess that was Book Ones ending.

Bouncing back would be, like I said before, learning from your mistakes and not repeating them.

———————-
"A character doesn’t have to be likable to be well-written." 
For villains… I suppose that is right. However for heroes you would think that you would want to like them at least a little for you to want to follow their 51 episode long journey. Does that mean you don’t like Korra then or that you don’t find her likable?
I’m confused by that part of your comment.
———————————-

Again, sighs. I never said that NONE of the guys who I mentioned didn’t make any mistakes. They made mistakes but they all either learned from their mistakes or paid for them. That’s what makes the likable. Korra, however, keeps repeating her mistakes, or not learning from them.

Book One with facing Amon… twice
Book Two with trusting crazy over friends/parents and trying to start a war
Book Three not listening, not thinking through, pretty much like Book One all over again.

—————-

I didn’t say that crying was bad…. In fact I’m going to have to stop here.
Half of what I said you are either reading out of context or making wild assumptions.

You are right to say that Korra from Book 2 isn’t the same as Korra Book 3, but she is still far from being an accomplished character.

Please list reasons on why she is an accomplished character, such as traits, goals, and whatnot.

I don’t want to be told I am wrong and that’s that or that you said this when I obviously didn’t say those things in plain written english.

I want to know what you like about character, what makes her a fully developed character and all that in your eyes. What draws you to her?

Peace and Love,

Piper of Dreams

MY HUMBLEST APOLOGIES TO YOU POOR TUMBLES WHO HAD TO SEE THIS LONG RANT! 

I’M SO SORRY!
FORGIVE ME! >_<

Anonymous asked:

I disagree. Korra is a phenomenal character. I honestly rolled my eyes at your post. Not that it's stupid because it's your opinion, but it's because it's annoying me that I disagree so much. The girl has gone through so much development. Actually, the part where you said Bryke shouldn't focus on just making her fight scenes look cool and who her love interest will be. Welp I'm just here to say you're in the minority and right now it's a popular opinion that Korra is a great character.

First of all, thanks for reading my post and for saying that you honestly disagree without calling me a profanity. Second of all, as for as fan minority and majority goes, that is largely based on what makes up a fandom. If there is a lot of ant-  and a lot of pro-posts it doesn’t necessarily attribute to how many numbers you have. There are many people on the anti-tag that would agree and I’ve debated with just as many who have disagreed with me. Going off views doesn’t count for much either as the rate of viewers watching LoK has plummetted dramatically. So I can’t really comment on what you said about the majority or minority.

As for my opinion and this possible debate, I would love to hear your reasons as for why she is a great character. I have been trying to learn more about why people like her, so if you could give me more insight, I would like to hear it. 

But saying Im wrong and you’re right isn’t an argument, it is just a statement with words. Proof and reason is what I am searching for, because I would love to love Korra like I used to.

Good day and thank you,

Sincerely,

DreamPiper

Korra Critique: Strong Female Characters and their Eventual Demise

coolman229:

machuran replied to your post:Hey, have you seen Korra’s new design for Book 4? I believe that it look nice. From viewing the facial expressions and aesthetics from the designs that Bryke provided, it seems that in Book 4, Korra will finally experience some character development. Just from the trailer of Book 4 ep 1, Korra is still in a wheelchair ( no immediate problem solving) and seems to be suffering from PTSD due to the Zaheer fight. Hopefully, Bryke doesn’t screw this up.

It seems the wheelchair thing seems to be in the first episode, possibly the second, I doubt she’ll stay there for long. The sneak peek that was released seems to take place early in the episode.

The wheelchair thing will be barely a side note in the story. Everyone’s acting like it will be this grand story arc where Korra goes through some Barbara Gordon-esque transformation and I’m like “Haven’t you see the last three seasons?”. 

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Pretty much this.

Bryke promised us many things in the past with Legend of Korra, and if there is one thing I have found, it’s that they make REALLY good trailers that promise REALLY great things, but it never lives up a hundred percent to those promises.

Despite all the disappointment and disinterest that came from Book 3, I was glad that they finally kicked down Korra a peg, especially since she’s been going around like a mad dog for the last three seasons. 
 
Sadly though, I predict her disabled state will only last three episodes tops, in which she will be up and at the usual business that she’s been up to for the last THREE seasons. They might even bring the love crap back.

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However, for me, I don’t particularly like Korra when she’s all calm, and acting like your typical “strong” level-headed teen fiction female characters like Katniss or Tris. I liked it better when she was more energetic, tough, determined yet just, and naive. Sure I know a character HAS to grow. But even in ATLA, Aang never lost his pacifistic ways, his goofball smile, and his optimistic views. Sure, he became calmer. But not at the expense of his true self. In fact, that was the whole lesson!

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I feel like Korra is turning into one of those girl protagonists that you find typically in YA/Teen Novels, which isn’t really bad, but not entirely good either (depending on which side of the writing spectrum you lean toward).

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Girls that can take on whatever they throw at them are great characters to aspire to, .but when that character sacrifices their personality and interesting character traits/flaws for the sake of being awesome…that’s when there is a problem.

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If guys can have realistic, flawed, yet lovable characters as main characters (like Aang, Hiccup, Simba, Harry Potter, Peter Parker, etc.) then I don’t see why we can’t have that sort of progression for female main characters as well. These are so rare in media today, and even if you do find some, they are even rarer in cartoons/action media. Most of the time, when you find these gems, you find that at one point they reach their eventual demise due to stereotypical problems.  However, there are three problems that I’ve seen occur the most in fiction with female main characters. They are the following:

ROMANCE- Eventually a love interest is introduced and throws EVERYTHING out of order for the girl MC. She loses all reasoning, all self-control, and all of those great traits that made her interesting for this “DREAMY HOT STUD!”

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Even worse is when a love triangle is introduced, taking the camera off of the main character and into the lives of ALL those involved with the war on love. Most of the time, a love triangle will do the opposite to evolve the character. Instead it sends them into the shallow depths of childish behavior, forgoing any logic for the possibility of TRUUU WUVVV (true love.)

The worst part. It can happy to ANY girl. No matter how tough, well-developed, or powerful she is, turning any potential wooing into a possible OOC moment.

TRAGEDY- Even worse than romance sometimes is when something incredibly tragic falls on the shoulder of the girl MC. Instead of giving time for the MC to grow though, like it should, it, more often than not, turns the characters into an entirely different person. Usually they lose key elements to their character, like traits that we had in common with them, or sympathetic traits, in exchange for tougher, hardened, angrier, or more rigid personalities. Sometimes they enter a catatonic state of emotion, being unstable or out of touch with the world, and therefore, out of touch with the audience. What is worse however, is when they never recover from this state. 

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They continue to act this way, but instead of growing from their experiences into a seasoned, better, or wiser character, they receive a reward or reverse-tragedy instead (Example: Character returns from the dead via deus ex machina, or a mistake is resolved entirely with no consequences). This teaches the female MC, or any MC for that, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. It doesn’t develop them, it just either returns them back to point A, or makes them more of a shallow character.


LEADERSHIP- Let me state that having a female MC as a leader is NOT A BAD THING. It is a wonderfully GOOD thing. However, what comes with leadership is usually what brings about the downfall of the character. With most stories, leadership changes how the character thinks, as it becomes more about who they are leading rather than who is leading. That means more responsibility, more stress, and more drama. This isn’t a bad thing though. Again, it gives the character another arena to grow within. But it could go down the wrong road as well.

Much like Tragedy, Leadership could take away from a character’s current personality, rather than expound on them and test them. Most of the time, the character might transform into a totally different person after dealing with all the pressures of being a leader, and that is totally fine. But if that character becomes totally unsympathetic by being either too perfect, too flawed, too powerful, or too detached from what made them a leader in the first place, it could potentially ruin them, or create a drift between the character and the observing audience. While this could set up a good path for a character becoming an antagonist, I don’t think it works well if the character is the main one. You could run the risk of the audience disliking them or losing interest in the them (in which you must then reintroduce the character for what they are worth).

ANYWHO~

There are many more reasons that lead to the eventual plummet of most female MCs, however these three have been really prominent in most media I have seen sadly.

In regards to Korra, I ultimately fear that she will fall down the Tragedy route or the Romance route (though she barely came out of the latter), unless they decide to give her a drive for something (like Aang had for peace and pacifism), return some of her more likeable, sympathetic traits from Book 1, and treat her as a person rather than a device to move the story.

When you strip a character of all their powers, all their strengths, all of their physical appearance, and all of their abilities there is supposed to be a human character underneath. But with Korra I don’t really see that. All I see is a female character that kick butt and sometimes has a temper, and sometimes doesn’t know what to do.

But that doesn’t make up a character. A character has strengths, weaknesses, flaws, behaviors, a personality and a mindset. And I just can’t find these in Korra, no matter how many episodes I try to watch to help.

Book 4 doesn’t need to give us a grand problem to fix or a super villain to fight like the last three books. If it simply allows Korra to grow for the first five episodes and to find her own niche, her own drive, her own personality, then I can probably forgive some of what LoK has tried to pull off. 

But I have to see it. 
It can’t be implied. 
It has to be right before my eyes.

It has to be seen, not heard.
Showed, not told.

So I hope Bryke can accomplish this, and start to care for Korra more, instead of caring how cool her fight scenes are, or which boy she gets with. With Korra in her current state, this is their perfect chance to do something good with Korra for once. And to not screw up like in the last two books.

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Sorry for this getting so long. It seems that whenever I start to say something about Legend of Korra I barf out a bunch of rant with it.

I am super passionate about strong female characters (not a feminist though, just want to see a girl character be as interesting as a guy without them being sexualized/abused and whatnot. I want to see them as a cultural norm, instead of a rarity).

Everything I talked about is just my opinion though. Not trying to ruin the show for anyone. Just start a dialogue.

Peace and Love,
Piper of Dreams.

PS: Gonna post this since it’s more of a critique than a short rant.

coolman229

Korra Critique: Strong Female Characters and their eventual Demise.

coolman229:

It seems the wheelchair thing seems to be in the first episode, possibly the second, I doubt she’ll stay there for long. The sneak peek that was released seems to take place early in the episode.

The wheelchair thing will be barely a side note in the story. Everyone’s acting like it will be this grand story arc where Korra goes through some Barbara Gordon-esque transformation and I’m like “Haven’t you see the last three seasons?”. 

Pretty much this.

Bryke promised us many things in the past with Legend of Korra, and if there is one thing I have found, it’s that they make REALLY good trailers that promise REALLY great things, but it never lives up a hundred percent to those promises.

Despite all the disappointment and disinterest that came from Book 3, I was glad that they finally kicked down Korra a peg, especially since she’s been going around like a mad dog for the last three seasons. 

Sadly though, I predict her disabled state will only last three episodes tops, in which she will be up and at the usual business that she’s been up to for the last THREE seasons. They might even bring the love crap back.


However, for me, I don’t particularly like Korra when she’s all calm, and acting like your typical “strong” level-headed teen fiction female characters like Katniss or Tris. I liked it better when she was more energetic, tough, determined yet just, and naive. Sure I know a character HAS to grow. But even in ATLA, Aang never lost his pacifistic ways, his goofball smile, and his optimistic views. Sure, he became calmer. But not at the expense of his true self. In fact, that was the whole lesson!


I feel like Korra is turning into one of those girl protagonists that you find typically in YA/Teen Novels, which isn’t really bad, but not entirely good either (depending on which side of the writing spectrum you lean toward).


Girls that can take on whatever they throw at them are great characters to aspire to, .but when that character sacrifices their personality and interesting character traits/flaws for the sake of being awesome…that’s when there is a problem.


If guys can have realistic, flawed, yet lovable characters as main characters (like Aang, Hiccup, Simba, Harry Potter, Peter Parker, etc.) then I don’t see why we can’t have that sort of progression for female main characters as well. These are so rare in media today, and even if you do find some, they are even rarer in cartoons/action media. Most of the time, when you find these gems, you find that at one point they reach their eventual demise due to stereotypical problems.  However, there are three problems that I’ve seen occur the most in fiction with female main characters. They are the following:

ROMANCE- Eventually a love interest is introduced and throws EVERYTHING out of order for the girl MC. She loses all reasoning, all self-control, and all of those great traits that made her interesting for this “DREAMY HOT STUD!”


Even worse is when a love triangle is introduced, taking the camera off of the main character and into the lives of ALL those involved with the war on love. Most of the time, a love triangle will do the opposite to evolve the character. Instead it sends them into the shallow depths of childish behavior, forgoing any logic for the possibility of TRUUU WUVVV (true love.)

The worst part. It can happy to ANY girl. No matter how tough, well-developed, or powerful she is, turning any potential wooing into a possible OOC moment.

TRAGEDY- Even worse than romance sometimes is when something incredibly tragic falls on the shoulder of the girl MC. Instead of giving time for the MC to grow though, like it should, it, more often than not, turns the characters into an entirely different person. Usually they lose key elements to their character, like traits that we had in common with them, or sympathetic traits, in exchange for tougher, hardened, angrier, or more rigid personalities. Sometimes they enter a catatonic state of emotion, being unstable or out of touch with the world, and therefore, out of touch with the audience. What is worse however, is when they never recover from this state.


They continue to act this way, but instead of growing from their experiences into a seasoned, better, or wiser character, they receive a reward or reverse-tragedy instead (Example: Character returns from the dead via deus ex machina, or a mistake is resolved entirely with no consequences). This teaches the female MC, or any MC for that, ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. It doesn’t develop them, it just either returns them back to point A, or makes them more of a shallow character.


LEADERSHIP- Let me state that having a female MC as a leader is NOT A BAD THING. It is a wonderfully GOOD thing. However, what comes with leadership is usually what brings about the downfall of the character. With most stories, leadership changes how the character thinks, as it becomes more about who they are leading rather than who is leading. That means more responsibility, more stress, and more drama. This isn’t a bad thing though. Again, it gives the character another arena to grow within. But it could go down the wrong road as well.

Much like Tragedy, Leadership could take away from a character’s current personality, rather than expound on them and test them. Most of the time, the character might transform into a totally different person after dealing with all the pressures of being a leader, and that is totally fine. But if that character becomes totally unsympathetic by being either too perfect, too flawed, too powerful, or too detached from what made them a leader in the first place, it could potentially ruin them, or create a drift between the character and the observing audience. While this could set up a good path for a character becoming an antagonist, I don’t think it works well if the character is the main one. You could run the risk of the audience disliking them or losing interest in the them (in which you must then reintroduce the character for what they are worth).

ANYWHO~

There are many more reasons that lead to the eventual plummet of most female MCs, however these three have been really prominent in most media I have seen sadly.

In regards to Korra, I ultimately fear that she will fall down the Tragedy route or the Romance route (though she barely came out of the latter), unless they decide to give her a drive for something (like Aang had for peace and pacifism), return some of her more likeable, sympathetic traits from Book 1, and treat her as a person rather than a device to move the story.

When you strip a character of all their powers, all their strengths, all of their physical appearance, and all of their abilities there is supposed to be a human character underneath. But with Korra I don’t really see that. All I see is a female character that kick butt and sometimes has a temper, and sometimes doesn’t know what to do.

But that doesn’t make up a character. A character has strengths, weaknesses, flaws, behaviors, a personality and a mindset. And I just can’t find these in Korra, no matter how many episodes I try to watch to help.

Book 4 doesn’t need to give us a grand problem to fix or a super villain to fight like the last three books. If it simply allows Korra to grow for the first five episodes and to find her own niche, her own drive, her own personality, then I can probably forgive some of what LoK has tried to pull off. 

But I have to see it. 
It can’t be implied. 
It has to be right before my eyes.

It has to be seen, not heard.
Showed, not told.

So I hope Bryke can accomplish this, and start to care for Korra more, instead of caring how cool her fight scenes are, or which boy she gets with. With Korra in her current state, this is their perfect chance to do something good with Korra for once. And to not screw up like in the last two books.

Sorry for this getting so long. It seems that whenever I start to say something about Legend of Korra I barf out a bunch of rant with it.
I am super passionate about strong female characters (not a feminist though, just want to see a girl character be as interesting as a guy without them being sexualized/abused and whatnot. I want to see them as a cultural norm, instead of a rarity).

Everything I talked about is just my opinion though. Not trying to ruin the show for anyone. Just start a dialogue.

Peace and Love,
Piper of Dreams.

PS: Gonna post this since it’s more of a critique than a short rant.